$AT?

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$AT?

Maya McCall '20, Editor-In-Chief

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Among the many burdens that afflict high school juniors and seniors is standardized testing, which has been placed solely into the hands of The College Board. This company has successfully manipulated their influence so that every high school student has heard of them. 

The College Board does not allow students to accomplish anything worth value without requiring a card number and security code; hence the fact that they generated 1.1 billion dollars of revenue in 2017. If you’re wondering how they’re able to achieve such a feat, here are some quick stats:

Test/Item Fee
SAT $49.50
SAT with Essay $64.50
Score Report Request $12
Rush Order $31
SAT Question and Answer Service $18
SAT Student Answer Service $13.50
AP Exam $94

While they offer fee waivers for underprivileged families, there is little regard for middle-class citizens who might not be able to easily afford these fees either. Therefore, middle-level income students are possibly limited to the number of tests or AP classes they can take. Alternatively, higher income students have limitless opportunities to achieve their highest scores on the SAT, since money is often not a factor. It is important to note that these students often have the ability to easily access resources, such as tutoring or the SAT Question and Answer Service.

This final quote briefly summarizes the inherent hypocrisy of this organization,“Although, in the matter of the SAT and AP tests, the number a student receives summarizing their academic potential is not the largest problem surrounding the college board. What should be addressed is the number on the price tag attached.”

So, do you believe that The College Board is actually concerned for our future, or do you agree that it is the perfect example of corporate greed?

Image courtesy of Wikipedia.

Facts courtesy of collegereadiness.collegeboard.org, financialsamurai.com and mcsun.org.