Social Media Addiction

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Social Media Addiction

Maya McCall '20, Editor-In-Chief

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Do you spend a lot of time thinking about social media or planning to use social media?

Do you feel the constant urge to use social media?

Do you utilize social media to neglect the issues in your life? 

Do you make attempts to “quit” social media and fail?

Do you feel irritated or troubled if you can’t use social media?

Does social media have a negative effect on your life or interactions with others?

Did you answer yes to the majority of these questions? If so, there is a possibility that you’re either a victim of social media addiction or you’re a frequent user who might need a hiatus from your app(s) of choice. 

Social media has invaded the lives of people all over the globe. While it can be used for positivity, it is often known as a medium to spread hate and create animosity. To put this into perspective, the majority of high school students and young adults in general no longer use the text and calling features on their devices; they resort to direct messaging and Snapchat calls instead. 

This presents an even bigger issue because users now have the excuse, “This is how I communicate with my friends and family,\. I can’t take a detox from my social media accounts.” Before making that claim, you should be aware of the negative side effects of the overuse of social media such as, “depression, low self-esteem, body image issues, anxiety, social isolation(…) It can even perpetuate eating disorders and self-harm behaviors.”

Due to those facts, here are three tips to help you detox from social media:

   Stay Connected

Let your family and friends know  that you’re taking a break from your social channels and that you’ll be communicating with them through texts, calls or emails; they’ll probably be proud and admire your decision.

   Replace that time with Positive Self-Reflection

Have a game plan put in place for when you do have the urge to redownload. Taking a walk, journaling, picking up a book or practicing positive “self talk” would all be great replacements for likes and retweets. 

   Delete Apps Entirely

Instead of telling yourself you’ll avoid them on your own, delete them entirely; it will immediately decrease temptation.

Image courtesy of Pixaby.

Facts courtesy of psychologytoday.com.